CASE STUDY: $133,864 Raised For Wurf Board On Kickstarter

"Crowdfunding agency" success with the Wurfboard

How an inflatable standing desk platform raised $133,864 on Kickstarter

We’ve all seen standing desks in coworking spaces, on Instagram captures and maybe even some of us have them.  But if you’re standing all day what do you stand on?  Most people would say “the floor” but Wurf Board’s are designed to up your standing desk game.

When we first took Wurf Board as a client we had our work cut out for us.  Our job was to build a list of interested backers before going live using a short video and a landing page.  However, we had just one problem, we had to do all of this without showing the product.  The patents weren’t all the way sorted out so we had to get creative in our approach.

Lead With Curiosity

We decided to build a list using the curiosity principle.  This marketing principle assumes that if you hint at something people will become curious and complete the next action.  If you’ve ever heard the term clickbait, it works on the same principle.

What we did was take the video and blur out the product in each shot.  This way the potential leads could see the person in the video was standing on something but could not tell what.  This triggers their curiosity index.  Our call to action was then,

“Enter your email to be the first to see the Wurf Board when we launch and get your own at a special discounted price.”

This worked really well and the landing page converted at 48%.  That means for every 100 visitors to the landing page, 48 gave us an email address.  Pretty sweet huh?

Fast forward a few months and we’re getting ready to launch.  While the ads were still running we started reaching out to bloggers and journalists we felt would be a good fit.  We started sending them emails and requested an embargo until launch date.  If you’re unfamiliar with the term embargo it’s basically an agreement between your company and the media outlet whereas the company will inform the media outlet about their upcoming launch but the media outlet will hold the story until launch day.  Ever seen a crowdfunding campaign get 10 media outlets to cover them on the first day?  This is how they do it.  They do all the work BEFORE going live.  

Launch Day

The first day of launch was a little slow but we made up for it in days 2 and 3.  Typically you want to raise 20% of your goal in the first 48 hours.  By day 3 we were close to 40%.

**Bonus Tip:  One thing we did for the very first time on this campaign was push paid Facebook traffic to an article that was written about us on Mashable.com.  Here is the link to the article.  When the article went live it wasn’t getting a lot of views so we decided to put $50 in Facebook ads and give it a boost.  This turned into almost 11,000 social shares and the story started going viral.  Mashable then put the story on their homepage and started promoting it on their Facebook page.  This led to a significant boost mid-campaign (Dec 15th and 16th) as seen in the chart below.

All in all, this was a fun and rewarding campaign to work on.  I would encourage those who have IP issues to use a similar strategy when launching their own crowdfunding campaign.  If you have questions, please ask them below or email me directly.

Eli Regalado – eli@madhatteragency.com

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